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IPCA

International Primary Care Association
 
 
 

Clinical Focus Primary Care

Abstract

Anaemia is frequently encountered in general practice. Anaemia is not a diagnosis but a presentation of an underlying cause. Although iron deficiency anaemia is the one that is most commonly recognised; there are various classifications of anaemia with numerous causes. It is important for primary care physicians to recognise, diagnose and appropriately manage all types of anaemia.
The article sets to deliver a concise overview of anaemia for the general physician with clear systematic pathways for common anaemias that can be adopted for use during a busy surgery.

Abstract

The causes of chronic cough in children are extensive and the majority of respiratory conditions may present with cough. It is, however, important to establish the correct diagnosis and to manage the underlying cause. We outline a clinical approach to the management of a child presenting to primary care with a chronic cough. Highlighted are the specific diagnostic pointers, red flag features and when to refer for specialist investigations.

Abstract

Depressive illness affects a significant proportion of those aged under 18. It is often underdiagnosed in young people despite having a significant effect on the young person’s quality of life and future health. This article aims to provide information for primary care clinicians to aid an understanding of the effect of depression on young people, and discuss diagnosis and management.

Abstract

Down syndrome is the most common identifiable cause of learning disability and occurs in approximately 1 in 1000 live births. Adults and children with Down syndrome are at increased risk of a wide range of medical problems which need to be identified early and treated appropriately.

Abstract

Patients diagnosed with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) are often concerned with the risk of amputation. The more significant risks, however, are mortality secondary to a myocardial infarction or stroke. The role of the general practitioner is key to the counselling and risk management of the patient to reduce the long term risk and prevent costly hospital admissions in an already financially challenged NHS.

The annual winter tempest to hit the NHS is blowing. The Times and Independent newspapers recently carried stories that the service is £2 billion in the red and this is even before the winter pressures have commenced.

Abstract

Vitamin D deficiency causes health problems in children and adolescents in the UK. Impacts on bone mass in particular in children and adolescents are significant and the costs of treating sequelae in adulthood high. Many guidelines exist to tackle the problem, but compliance with these by patients (and doctors!) is not perfect. For improvements to be made at a population level we suggest that a universal approach to vitamin D needs to be taken, together with specific targeting of key at risk groups such as children and adolescents. Educating at risk mothers and children now will improve the health awareness of the adult population in years to come.

Abstract

By definition, a woman having a healthy uncomplicated pregnancy, who has a normal balanced diet, does not need dietary supplements. The justification for routine population supplementation therefore depends upon the incidence of deficiency in that particular population, and the balance between the benefits of supplementation for those who have a deficient diet and the harms that can occur from excessive consumption of individual nutrients in those who are already replete. General guidelines for the detection of individual deficiency are outlined, together with suggested nutritional supplements to correct them.

 
 

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