Font Size

Profile

Menu Style

Cpanel

IPCA

International Primary Care Association
 
 
 

Clinical Focus Primary Care

15% of new or recurrent asthma in adulthood is due to workplace exposures. Occupational asthma occurs due to an allergic reaction to an airborne allergen whereas ‘work exacerbated (pre-existing) asthma’ is a response to non-specific irritants. If detected early, occupational asthma is curable but a false positive diagnosis can have devastating consequences.

Diabetic Neuropathy (DN) is the most common complication of diabetes and represents a heterogeneous group of neurological conditions. Although any nerve in the body may be affected, the length dependent distal symmetrical sensory predominant neuropathy is the most common presentation. Diabetic neuropathy often develops insidiously and often remains asymptomatic until well established. Important complications of DN include the development of neuropathic pain, autonomic features, foot deformities and ulceration all which lead to considerable morbidity. Furthermore, it is also considered to represent an increased mortality risk.

Pathogenic triggers apart from hyperglycaemia, such as cardiometabolic and vascular factors, are being increasingly recognised to play a significant role in DN development. Newer putative agents have shown promise in experimental diabetic neuropathy but are yet to be clinically proven. Thus, glucose control remains the only proven strategy to delay the development of DN. Management of neuropathic pain and foot risk assessment and ulcer prevention strategies are important clinical considerations. In this review, I discuss the classification, diagnosis and management of the DN.

Women with epilepsy have specific needs during their reproductive years. It is imperative that their general practitioner is familiar with the relevant issues and aware of how to address these, as well as knowing what to anticipate and expect from specialist joint neurology/obstetric care.

The oesophagus is a highly specialised muscular tube, whose function is to transport food from the mouth to the stomach, where the process of digestion starts. This requires an efficient and coordinated process. Due to its proximity to the lungs, disorders of the oesophagus may present to the respiratory physician and may be wrongly treated as respiratory disorders. 

Chronic cough is defined as cough that persists for more than 8 weeks. Its exact prevalence has proved difficult to estimate and recurrent cough is reported by 3-40% of the population1-4 It is also a common reason for attendance to a health clinic and can be very difficult to treat. Chronic cough may be due to underlying oesophageal disorders.

This review article discusses the oesophageal disorders that can present with respiratory symptoms.

Sleep medicine is a fairly new subspecialty with many disorders. In order to understand sleep disorders, it is essential to understand normal sleep. In this review, we discuss normal sleep and how investigate suspected sleep disorders.

A 65 years old lady with a history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and well controlled hypertension is brought to A&E with central chest discomfort of 2 days duration. Her BP was 143/89 mmHg, Pulse 98 regular. Normal ECG. The A&E doctors arranged CT Aortogram to exclude aortic dissection. What is the diagnosis based on the imaging?

Since my last editorial the medico-political remain the same but the calamities seem to have risen, confusion reigns and decision making is blighted.  

Abstract

The diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in a primary care setting is challenging; it is seldom seen, compared to other more benign conditions presenting with chest pain, and missing the diagnosis can be catastrophic for the patient. Prompt diagnosis facilitates access to early revascularisation which improves outcomes. This article will update general practitioners on the diagnosis and management of acute coronary syndromes and provides case-based examples with ECGs to improve diagnostic confidence.

 
 

BBC News Feed

Get in touch

Give us a call at
+44 207 637 3544

Email us at
info @ ipcauk.org

Address:

International Primary Care Association
73 Newman Street, London, W1T 3EJ
UK