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IPCA

International Primary Care Association
 
 
 

Clinical Focus Volume 6 N3

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Abstract

General Practitioners are commonly faced with abnormalities of the full blood count. This can vary from thrombocytopenia, to lymphocytosis to eosinophilia, amongst others. We aim to provide practical guidance for managing these problems in primary care, with reference to various professional guidelines where appropriate. The approach to other disorders such as lymphadenopathy, paraproteins, haemochromatosis, as well as antibodies in pregnancy, is also discussed. The approach to anaemia has been covered in a separate linked article.

Abstract

Herbal supplements are in widespread use in all medical specialties. Evidence that supports their efficacy and safety is often lacking and the GP, physician or specialist nurse are left with very little objective advice to give patients. In this article, an update is given on a range of supplements used in musculoskeletal medicine with the specific purpose of informing health care providers and allowing them to offer the best advice on their use.

Abstract

Sexual dysfunctions affect both men and women and include Delayed Ejaculation, Male Erectile Disorder, Female Orgasmic Disorder, Female Sexual Interest-Arousal Disorder, Genito-Pelvic Pain Disorder/Penetration Disorder, Male Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder, Premature Ejaculation and Substance-Medication Induced Sexual Dysfunction. Untreated sexual dysfunctions may cause significant distress and interpersonal difficulty in some individuals or couples. The diagnosis of sexual dysfunctions includes a thorough medical history and evaluation, followed by the appropriate medical, psychological and psychosocial treatment interventions.

Abstract

By definition, a woman having a healthy uncomplicated pregnancy, who has a normal balanced diet, does not need dietary supplements. The justification for routine population supplementation therefore depends upon the incidence of deficiency in that particular population, and the balance between the benefits of supplementation for those who have a deficient diet and the harms that can occur from excessive consumption of individual nutrients in those who are already replete. General guidelines for the detection of individual deficiency are outlined, together with suggested nutritional supplements to correct them.

Abstract

Vitamin D deficiency causes health problems in children and adolescents in the UK. Impacts on bone mass in particular in children and adolescents are significant and the costs of treating sequelae in adulthood high. Many guidelines exist to tackle the problem, but compliance with these by patients (and doctors!) is not perfect. For improvements to be made at a population level we suggest that a universal approach to vitamin D needs to be taken, together with specific targeting of key at risk groups such as children and adolescents. Educating at risk mothers and children now will improve the health awareness of the adult population in years to come.

 
 

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